How do I care for my string of hearts plant?

Lazy Flora string of hearts ceropegia woodii

With simply gorgeous heart-shaped, patterned leaves, the string of hearts plant has stolen our hearts here at Lazy Flora not just for Valentine’s day any day of the year. 

Originally from

South Africa

Other names

  • Ceropegia woodii
  • Rosary Vine

Watering

The string of hearts is a semi-succulent plant, which means it is more tolerant of dry soil than wet soil and is prone to rotting in wet soil. You should water it sparingly, if in doubt. You can always add more water.

You can confidently allow the soil to dry out completely between waterings. This plant goes dormant in Autumn and Winter and therefore needs less watering. The soil should be lightly moist in spring and summer.

Light conditions required

Keep your string of hearts in bright light, with some direct sun (but not all day) for the best colour and plenty of leaves.

If you notice large spaces between leaves, the chances are the plant is not getting enough light.

Temperature and humidity

This is a plant that enjoys 40-50% humidity and thrives between 18 and 24 Celcius, so is well-suited to most UK homes.

Flowering

The main attraction of this plant is the beautifully-shaped leaves and the gorgeous pattern on its trailing leaves, but it does also produce small purple flowers in the spring/summer.

Size

Trails to 90cm or more.

Propagation

As your string of hearts grows, you might notice little bead-like nodules on the vines. These appear after the plant has flowered. If these nodules touch the soil, the nodule will send down roots into the soil and another new plant will form. So you can drape the nodules over the surface of the pot, or cut the vines by the nodules and place the vine with the nodule on the surface of the soil to encourage it to grow another plant in the same pot – or even share cuttings with your friends.

In the UK, the string of hearts won’t survive our winter temperatures outdoors. However, in its native habitat, this plant propagates and spreads so quickly and easily that it can be hard to control. It’s a great first plant to get started with propagation.

If you like the look of this plant, you can get one for yourself until 14 February 2019 by clicking on this button.